How To Get Rid Of Japanese Knotweed?

How To Get Rid Of Japanese Knotweed

In this post, I will explain how to get rid of Japanese Knotweed with 4 easy methods.

Japanese Knotweed, also known as Polygonum Cuspidatum, is an invasive plant that has been growing in North America for decades without much control. It was introduced to the United States back in 1917 and now covers more than one million acres of land across the country. This plant grows quickly and has very strong roots, making it difficult to remove it by hand.

But fret not! There are some ways you can get rid of Japanese knotweed at home without needing to call a professional.

What is Japanese Knotweed?

Japanese knotweed is a plant that can be found in many parts of the world, including all of Europe and North America. It’s commonly found in moist areas near water sources, but it’s also been spotted growing on dry land. The invasive weed has a thick stem which grows to about two feet tall and resembles bamboo when young.

Japanese Knotweed produces flowers with white or pink petals that bloom from July through September, attracting bees and butterflies to its nectar-filled blooms. When Japanese knotweed matures, it becomes covered in sharp bristles with leaves divided into three leaflets per leaf branch. This mature plant will often produce red berries when autumn arrives before dying after frost sets in for the winter months.

How to Get Rid of Japanese Knotweed

If you have Japanese knotweed on your property, it’s important to take steps to get rid of it as soon as possible. The weed can quickly spread and take over an area if left unchecked. There are a few different ways to get rid of Japanese knotweed, including physical removal, herbicides, or biological control methods.<

Physical Removal

The simplest way to get rid of Japanese knotweed is by physically removing it from the ground. You can do this by hand or with a tool such as a shovel or hoe. Be sure to remove all of the plant’s roots so that it doesn’t regrow. This method is most effective when done in spring and early summer when the plant is still young.

Herbicides

Pruning, digging up, and mowing Japanese knotweed won’t kill it so be sure to use a strong herbicide such as glyphosate or triclopyr if you want to get rid of Japanese knotweed in this way. It may take several applications before you notice any results since the weed can regenerate from its roots even after being cut down. Biocontrol Methods

If using herbicides isn’t an option for your home or business then consider biological control methods like insects that eat Japanese knotweed instead. These types of natural predators will starve out the plant rather than killing it with chemicals. Two common biocontrol options are the leaf-feeding sawfly and a root-eating beetle.

How to Get Rid of Japanese Knotweed With Insects

Insects can be an easy way to get rid of Japanese knotweed without having to use chemicals. There is a downside, however, in that it may take some time for them to kill off the weed so if you mind invasive weeds in your garden, this may not be the option for you. The good news about insects is most will have no effect on other plants around them so they won’t cause additional issues in your garden or property.

The two insects that are most commonly used to kill Japanese knotweed are both beetles: the Japanese beetle and the European chafer.<

Japanese beetle

The adult Japanese beetle has a metallic green head and thorax with copper-brown wing covers. Its abdomen is a coppery color too, making it easy to spot when it flies away to feed on nearby plants. These beetles usually emerge from mid-June through the end of July and fly into fall before going into hibernation. They’re attracted to plants that produce pheromones called alkenes, which include many garden plants such as fruit trees, roses, linden trees, and viburnum shrubs, along with Japanese knotweed plant leaves.<

European chafer

This brownish or dark red beetle eats Japanese knotweed leaf shoots in May and June. Because the larvae hatch out beneath the soil’s surface, they are difficult to spot and often go undetected until the damage is already done. The adult beetles lay their eggs in the ground near knotweed plants in late summer and early fall so there is usually more than one generation of these insects present at any given time.

Both of these beetles are effective at eating Japanese knotweed leaves, shoots, and flowers. They will also eat the weed’s roots, eventually killing it. Although either beetle can be used on its own, using them together is most effective. You can purchase them from a garden center or online store that sells insecticides.<

If you have Japanese knotweed on your property, it’s important to take steps to get rid of it as soon as you can before it becomes established. If herbicides are an option for your property, using them regularly is the best way to kill off young shoots and prevent new growth from occurring.

If this isn’t an option then consider biological methods such as insects that eat Japanese knotweed.

Insects are a low-cost solution for getting rid of Japanese knotweed without resorting to chemicals on your lawn or garden.

What kills Japanese knotweed?

Japanese knotweed is a plant that has been introduced in North America and Australia. It’s an invasive species with the potential to cause serious problems for agriculture, forestry, natural ecosystems, human health and even buildings.

It can grow from one inch tall to over 20 feet tall in just one year! It also spreads rapidly by rhizomes (horizontal stems underground) making it difficult to eradicate once established. The roots of Japanese knotweed are shallow, so they do not need deep soil or lots of water like other plants.

They spread quickly because they produce more than 50 000 seeds per square meter per year which are dispersed by wind and animals as well as humans moving them around unintentionally on their clothing or shoes. These seeds germinate very quickly and the plants can grow in any type of soil.

There are many ways to get rid of Japanese knotweed, but the most effective way is to use a herbicide such as glyphosate. Glyphosate kills the plant by preventing it from making certain proteins that are essential for its growth. You will need to spray the entire plant including the leaves, stems, and flowers. The herbicide will take a few weeks to kill the plant, so you will need to be patient.

You can also try digging up the rhizomes or using a weed killer like RoundUp which will kill the plant down to the root. Be careful when using herbicides or weed killers as they can be harmful if not used correctly. Always read the label and follow the instructions.

Another way to get rid of Japanese knotweed is by using a physical barrier such as a fence or a wall. The plant cannot grow over or through these barriers. However, this method is not always effective and can be quite expensive.

You can also try manually pulling out the plants, but this is very time consuming and difficult to do on a large scale.

It’s important to note that Japanese knotweed can re-grow from just a small piece of the rhizome so it’s important to remove all of the roots if you want to ensure that the plant will not come back.

The best way to prevent Japanese knotweed from spreading is to be aware of it and not move it around to other areas. If you see Japanese knotweed, report it to your local authorities.

How To Get Rid Of Japanese Knotweed

Does vinegar kill Japanese knotweed?

Japanese knotweed is a type of invasive plant that can be difficult to remove. It grows quickly and spreads rapidly, often taking over other plants in the area. You should not try to kill it with vinegar or other home remedies.

Conclusion

Japanese knotweed is an invasive plant that can be difficult to remove. It grows quickly and spreads rapidly, often taking over other plants in the area. The best way to get rid of it is by using a herbicide such as glyphosate or by digging up rhizomes from where they have been buried underground. Be careful when using these chemicals on your lawn or garden because they can harm you if not used correctly. Always read the label and follow the instructions before spraying anything onto your property with herbicides or weed killers!

Reference: Homeowner’s Guide to Japanese Knotweed Control

Noah Burns

I am Noah Burns- The Guy behind I will Make You Smart. I love to experiment and test new products with an aim to create informative contents for readers like you. It is my aim to make this site a leading source of information and reviews to help consumers make more informed buying decisions.

Recent Posts